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  • 167 Reasons Why Not Mandela Day

    1. In Berlin 1884 we were land tenure stripped
    2. Before we were killed
    3. Dispossesed
    4. ’94, Adorn like monkey in Armani
    5. Polished,

  • Q&A with Nozipho Zulu: ZuluGal Retro

    ZuluGal Retro has grown exponentially since being mentored through the Amaphiko programme. I have been able to grow the ZuluGal Retro brand by firstly establishing my company identity, with the assistance of the network I have access to and the help I received to design my company logo and create a company profile.

  • Proudly HOTEP

    The Grand Master Builder, the Master Mason known as the 'Opener of Stone' and the 'God of Medicine', the Chancellor of the King of Lower Kemet, First after the King, Chief of the King, Chief Physician, Vizier of Great Pharoah, Administrator of the Great Palace, Hereditary Lord, High Priest of the Shrine, the Builder, the Sculptor, the Maker of Stone Vases, Voice of God, Architect of the Cosmos.

  • Diego Garcia: A Story Of Untold Black Erasure

    “To be black and beautiful means nothing in this world unless we are black and powerful.”

  • Love & Revolution

    I had a conversation with my best friend Khanyisile (who is studying towards her PHD in clinical science and immunology by the way, I must mention this because black womxn stay inspiring at this life thing) about what could inform a complete re-creation of black communities.

  • The Contested Renaming Of The South African Airports

    The National Party through its own interpretation of the concept of the four nations thesis, segmented it into ethnic groups and employed it for its own racialised agenda – separate development and the establishment of ‘homelands/Bantustans’.

  • A Fallist Reviews, The Fall

    Under dimmed lights the play starts off with the actors, costumed in typical student fashion, singing some of the fallist songs. It immediately resonatea and the feeling of familiarity and nostalgia engulfs me. In the midst of that, a character played by Cleo Raatus resides a poem.

  • Taxi to Zonke

    The last time I ever found myself trapped inside a people-carrying contraption of the taxi industry was shortly before the launch of the now demonized taxi recapitalisation programme that sought to reduce the number of a washed-out herd of Datsun E20s, the Toyota Super Series and the late 1970s favourites, amakatshibane.

  • Black Excellence = White Approval

    There are Blacks who believe that they have 'arrived' and because of this -they get highly irritated by Blacks who still talk about racism as a factor in Black life.

  • The Fall

    The critically acclaimed play, The Fall, which reflects on the recent University of Cape Town’s #RhodesMustFall movement will be headlining the 10th Annual Youth Expression Festival to commemorate Youth Month this June at State Theatre.

  • I Am Single

    It always seems shocking when you tell people that you’re single. It’s like you’ve just announced that you have a chronic disease. There’s always sadness and a look of pity that you get upon announcing that there is no man in your life.

  • In The Morning, Behold It Was Leah!

    I fear that Blacks may find themselves yet again waking up in the morning after the elections next to whites who have smuggled themselves into bed and in fact married them selves to the Black struggle permanently in order to safeguard white interests.

  • The Liberation Concert

    Music is Africa, it’s the little we have left after colonialism and the freedom that only lives in papers, the one mineral that remains in our spirits is music, the heartbeat of Africans. With that said, I think it’s safe to say that the Liberation Concert, was a liberation indeed of the heart as the theatre was heavy with presence and life.

  • My Hole, My Home - The Review

    On a cold, ferocious and untrusty pavement of inner Johannesburg an unusual friendship exists between Elijah Simama (Mandla Gaduka), a sickly, devout Christian elderly Motswanaman and Silence Mhlongo (Seneliso Dladla), his reluctantly atheist yet unseasoned boisterous Zulu companion.

  • Like A Lion In The Wild, Land Is Our Natural Habitat

    How can we protect ourselves from sickness when we have no control over what we eat and what we drink? They monopolize everything, including seedlings that we need to plant organic fruit and vegetables.

  • Blacks Can’t Be Racist: Moeletsi Mbeki’s Artificial Post-Racial Destination In South Africa

    To date, a high percent of land in South Africa is still owned by the few whites. This is not acceptable and should not be the case. It is the betrayal to all those who died fighting for our liberation. Fanon stated that every generation has its own struggle and must define itself.

  • Australia: Strolen Land

    Owing to the propaganda campaign of anti-Black bodies like Afri-Forum, recently the Australian Minister of Home Affairs, Peter Dutton, publicly declared the Australian government's willingness to fast track the visa applications for white South African farmers.

  • Emakasana

    following untold periods in self-Coventry to the bourgeois quarters of comfortable Johannesburg, I finally plucked up the courage to journey back to emakasana this past weekend for some R ‘n R with kith and kin, and some long-standing associates.

  • LEGENDS LIVE at MTN Bushfire 2018

    The MTN Bushfire, Swaziland, 2018 artist line-up just got that much hotter with the announcement of African mega-starsSalif Keita & Yemi Alade & Ladysmith Black Mambazo as the latest addition to the main-stage for the festival taking place from May 25th – 27th.

  • Uncensored Black Consciousness: The Return

    It is an undeniable fact that we have certainly travelled a milestone since the original concept of Black Consciousness was introduced and written by the late legendary social activist, Steven Bantu Biko, in his piece, I Write What I Like.

  • Mama Veronica Sobukwe Receives Order Of Luthuli: An Honor Too Little, Too Late

    On the 28th April 2018, a day after Freedom Day, 90 years old struggle stalwart and anti-apartheid activist affectionately known as the ‘Mother of Azania’, Mama Zondeni Veronica Sobukwe, will be awarded the Order of Luthuli: Silver by South African President, Cyril Ramaphosa, at the Sefako Makgatho Presidential Guest House in Pretoria.

  • Bedlam in Bedlam

    Bedlam In Bedlam written and performed by Wazi M Kunene, is set to showcase on Saturday 12 May 2018 at the J&B Hive in Braamfontein Johannesburg. The poetry and music showcase features a four piece band (Bass, Drums, Keys, and Lead Guitar).

  • A Celebration of Bra Hugh Masekela

    Joburg Theatre, in collaboration with The Hugh Masekela Heritage Foundation, will usher in Africa Month with a heart-warming celebration of Hugh Masekela’s theatrical music in an exclusive four-performance season on The Mandela stage, from Thursday, May 3rd to Sunday, May 6th.

  • Koša Ke Nnete

    Black Thought Symposium is a collective of artists, scholars and members of the community who are interested in using aesthetics as a theoretical site for understanding and giving account to the world we live in. The collective is committed to the development of arts and politics in a way that will translate into material change in our society.

  • The True History OF Sharpeville

    Post-1994 South Africa has a theatrical crisis of selective amnesia and partisan re-memberings of history.

  • Deluge In Swarga

    The captivating images, imagery, colours, sound and textures in the opening of Deluge in Swarga set Wazi Kunene apart and certainly compel one to calm down, shut down, listen up and be completely present.

  • Mama Sobukwe: The Mother of Azania

    “My mother is a very private person”. Dinilesizwe (bra Dini) Sobukwe – Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe’s eldest son – restrains our expectations in a sing-song deep-baritone voice that threatens to break into Barry White’s Acapella every time he opens his mouth.

  • Tjovitjo – For Us By Us

    For Azanians, our lives, our experiences and existence is the copyrighted sole property of a settler minority who have appointed themselves narrators of black life. In the arts and academia, this proprietorship is the normalised reality that artists of the land have to contend with in order to collect the crumbs meted out by the free market system.

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